ME/CFS – EXPLAINED!

1. Going over your activity baseline.

2. A sudden relapse

3. Trying new protocols.

4. Pacing

5. Realising you’ve been referred for GET

6. Realising you’ve been referred for CBT

7. Those days you want to just disappear.

8. The 80 year old man you see jogging past your house.

9. Graded exercise therapy.

10. How the government treats ME/CFS research

11. A good day

12. How your life used to be.

13. Your occupational therapist

https://i1.wp.com/24.media.tumblr.com/50e8d01f6069e773eaa64f5bedce1fc4/tumblr_mx2scsjpkh1s3j0n9o7_400.gif

14. Department of work and pensions

https://i1.wp.com/awesomegifs.com/wp-content/uploads/angry-cat-fuck-this.gif

15. Understanding family & friends

16. Bathtime

17.Working from home.

18. Home help.

19. When you finally get a diagnosis

20. Your doctor

21. Clinical trials.

22. Advanced graded exercise therapy.

23. Post exertional malaise

24. A rare symptom free day

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19 thoughts on “ME/CFS – EXPLAINED!

  1. LMAO, I’ve been awake for 22 hours so far and I was in bed reading trying not to wake my hubby up with shaking the bed I was laughing so much. It is so true as well. Well done for encapsulating all the trials and tribulations that go with this horrendous illness. Debbie

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Denise Ravenscroft

    thank you so much for this! I haven’t laughed so much for a very long time. It was funny but it hit where it hurt too, which goes to show how bloody true this is.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Some of the photos are missing? 😕

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Having a really bad one today, had a nasty virus for the last week that’s really kicked my arse. Feeling very emotional & rubbish today, then I find this page for the first time & it’s got me both laughing & crying at the same time! Thank you for making me feel not so alone xx

    Liked by 1 person

  5. It needs a patient in a doctors office with captions processing thoughts like “fuck you, you under educated imbecile you’re suppose to help me not drive me over the edge” or something like could you dehumanize me again.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. You nailed it! Thank you! I haven’t laughed so hard in a long time!!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Funniest damn thing I’ve ever seen!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Brilliant explanation

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Absolutely beautiful…..made my heart smile…..I do not feel so alone……thank you!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I absolutely love this! So glad I found your interpretation of ME/CFS explained! I was laughing so hard, I relate to all of these, and am going to make everyone I know watch these. Maybe then they’ll understand a little more how it feels to deal with constant fucking shit! Thank you!!!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. I’m not sure how I discovered this the other day, but it’s getting a lot of likes at phoenixrising Joke of the Day where I linked it. Thank you for your eloquence. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Lucie Forand

    So funny to see that my hope and naïveté are shared. The Pacing and The good day made me laugh, again and again. The enthusiasm of the moment and the brutal test of reality, to be experienced again next week, in a different form. I did not understand Realising you have been referred for GET. I am a francophone and don’t know this GET abbreviation. Can someone explain?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks for commenting. Graded exercise therapy (GET) is a structured exercise programme that aims to gradually increase how long you can carry out a physical activity. This will usually involve aerobic exercise (exercise that raises your heart rate) such as swimming or walking. It is usually not well received by patients with ME/CFS, hence the gif.

      I’ll also attempt to translate into french. Standby for failure:

      Merci pour commenter. La thérapie d’exercice graduée (GET) est un programme d’exercice structuré qui vise à accroître progressivement la durée, vous pouvez effectuer une activité physique. Cela conduit souvent à des exercices aérobiques (exercice qui augmente votre rythme cardiaque), comme la natation ou la marche. Il n’est généralement pas bien reçu par les patients atteints ME/CFS, d’où le gif.

      Liked by 1 person

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